Hadron H2 – A New Development in Singlehander Design

Keith Callaghan explains the thinking behind the H2.

Over the last few years I have been developing (among other things) a singlehander for a generation which I think has been left behind by the manufacturers and innovators – people who were keen dinghy sailors in their youth, but then got out of sailing as such things as career, children and mortgages took precedent. Then, years later, they find that the mortgage is paid off and the kids are gone – time to get back into dinghy sailing!

That generation may not be as fit as they used to be, and have put on a little weight perhaps, but they have a lot of sailing experience and know a good boat from a duffer. They can’t be bothered with the hassle of finding and keeping a good and reliable crew, so it’s a singlehander for them – but what is there in the marketplace which comprehensively satisfies their needs? NOTHING.

Basically, there is a great hole in what is apparently an overcrowded singlehander market.

So I set about designing a singlehander with the following attributes:

The H2 floats very low when capsized

The H2 floats very low when capsized

– Classic good looks which will not age.

–  Impeccable handling characteristics.

– Comfortable!

– Versatile – at home on the sea or inland.

– Quick and exciting but not extreme.

– A delight to own and sail, and built to last, using the best materials and accessories available.

– Easy to handle afloat and ashore (I find that dragging the vessel up the slipway after a race is the most exhausting part of the day).

– Easy to recover after a capsize.

In 2011, I produced my fourth singlehander design – the Hadron. It was of 4 plank plywood construction and fitted most of the above requirements – except in two ways: it was rather heavy (93kg) and the rig was not ‘gust-responsive’. Nonetheless, it had many plus points and I thought that if I could sort the two main issues then we would have a boat that appealed to a wide range of people.

So I teamed up with Simon Hipkin and we decided to go for a ‘mark 2’ version –to be called ‘Hadron H2’ or just ‘H2’. Simon has engineered all the mould tooling.  The H2 is of carbon/aramid/epoxy/foam composite construction, using the latest techniques to maximise the carbon to resin ratio – it’s a boat for the future so let’s make it with the latest techniques and materials. So she is much lighter than the plywood boat – about the weight of a Phantom – easy to pull around ashore as well as adding performance on the water. The rig is about 7% smaller (9.3 sq m instead of 10 sq m) and has been developed by HD Sails. The rig retains the kicked-up boom of the original –- the increased headroom greatly assists when tacking, and the boat has to heel a long way before the boom end hits the water.

White Formula UK produced two pre-production boats in early 2016 and these boats have been used to try different rig options to develop a user-friendly rig.

Under water, the design is unchanged except that the shape is now ’round bilge’ instead of ‘multi-chine’. Above water there are several significant changes – for aesthetic, structural and performance reasons. The upper chine is retained and accentuated by concave topsides. The stem is now vertical and the transom cut away. With other detailed styling changes she is an eye-catching boat with classic lines.

As with the original Hadron, the interior incorporates a low bow tank, a central longitudinal buoyancy tank and no side buoyancy: this allows the boat to sit low in the water after a capsize to facilitate righting, but the buoyancy comes into play once righted and two bailers soon remove what water remains. In the H2 we have added a shallow stern tank to further reduce the residual water and improve recovery time. A further possible refinement is the use of ‘slow draining’ buoyancy compartments under the side decks – the leeward compartment fills on capsize and when the boat is righted the water is allowed to drain away in about 20 seconds – the trapped water provides a temporary counterbalance for the helm as he clambers in over the weather gunwhale, thus minimising the chances of a re-capsize to weather. Another safety feature is the open transom, which facilitates re-entry of an exhausted crew after a capsize, should they be unable to get over the gunwhale.

The absence of a full double bottom means that the generous hull depth can be fully utilised to provide an ergonomic sitting out position – no ‘straight-leg’ sitting out required!

The PY of the boat is expected to be somewhere between a Blaze and a Finn. Standard fit-out utilises Allen Brothers fittings, and is comprehensive. Carbon spars and HD sail are included. Everything about the boat is premium quality and even though light in weight, is designed to last. Buyers will have a choice of a very wide range of hull and deck colours. Price will be similar to that for Blaze or a Phantom, but we plan to have some very special introductory offers.

As Tom Gruitt said in the original Yachts and Yachting review of the Hadron (Mk1), it is an “An extremely well-mannered boat which was very comfortable to sail while still giving the performance to put a smile on your face”. We will be building on that concept with the new carbon composite Hadron H2.

I suggested earlier that this boat is designed with the more mature person in mind – but H2 will appeal to all who take enjoyment from the superb performance and handling, quality manufacture and design, and pride in ownership of a modern classic singlehander.

For a ‘First impressions’ reaction from yachting journalist David Henshall, read this article.